Small Arms of the Boer War

Rifles and Carbines

Mausers

Orange Free State Mauser (late model).
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Orange Free State Model (early model). Note the initials "SCL" carved onto the stock.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Transvaal Mausers--The top one is a carbine.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

The Mauser, has proved to be the most reliable,  most widely-copied and most successful military rifle for decades. This was the primary small arm of the Boer forces. Great quantities of Mausers and ammunition were ordered before the outbreak of the war. The Mauser was light, highly accurate, and its rate of fire was above that of the British Lee-Enfield rifles. These rifles came in carbine form, as well as the long version, shown above.

Guédes

Guedes rifle. This one is Z.A.R. marked.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Westley Richards

Westley Richards .577/.450 rifle and is one of the "Made Specially For Z.A.R." pieces. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Westley Richards .577/.450 carbine. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Martini-Metford, cavalry carbine.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Martini-Enfield, AC, Mk I 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Lee Enfields

 

Lee-Enfield Cavalry Carbine, #1 and the sword that goes with it for cavalry troops. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Lee-Enfield Mark I. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Lee Metfords

 

Lee-Metford Mark I. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Lee-Metford Mk II

Handguns

 

Webley Fosbery, early model. Cal. .455. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Webley Mark I. Cal. .455. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Webley Mark II
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Webley Mark III, presented by the citizens of a Canadian town
to a Captain in the 2nd Canadian Contingent on the eve of his going to
the South African War. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Webley Mark IV. .455 cal. Issued extensively on the British side and probably captured and used by the Boer side. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Webley G, mod. 1889.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

  

Army Model 1896 Webley G. Cal. .455/.476. 
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

 

Webley G, Mod 1896
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA. 

Webley, #4 Pryse
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Enfield Mark II. Cal. .476. These saw limited use in the South African War.
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.




C 96 Mauser "Broomhandle" Pistol. Used by both sides during the war. This weapon is unusual in that the stock holster is covered in leather. Normally they are made of wood only.
Photograph: H Labushcagne. 
Weapon: From the private collection of Dr. Lucas Potgieter, Johannesburg, South Africa.
More information at: http://www.northwest-denture.com/mauser1896/ 

 

Bayonets

Photo: H Labuschagne

BRITISH BAYONET, P 1888, Mk I
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

BRITISH BAYONET, P 1888, Mk I, SECOND TYPE
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

BRITISH BAYONET, P 1888, Mk II
Photo generously supplied by Ken Hallock, USA.

Machine Guns

Homemade Boer machine gun

 

British machine gun position